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English 38
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)
into effect just moments ago. >> that's right. the deal was announced in cairo by the egyptian foreign minister and the u.s. secretary of state. the truce calls for an immediate halt to the fighting and reportedly aims to work towards a longer-term solution as well. >> the latest escalation in violence began just over a week ago. since then, some 140 palestinians and five israelis have been killed in air strikes and rocket attacks. >> we will be trying to go live to cairo and also to gauze in a moment, but first, let's get back to evens earlier in it -- earlier in the day that threatens to derail the talks -- we will be trying to go live to cairo and also to gaza in a moment. >> panic on the streets of televisa. ambulances rushed to the scene of the explosion. -- panic on the streets of tel aviv. the bus was burned out but not torn apart, suggesting it may have been a relatively small bomb. israel is calling this a orist attack. >> hamas is a murderous organization, an organization that calls for israel's destruction. anyone who negotiates with them and the prime minister's holding tal
we've got reports tonight from israel and cairo. and christiane amanpour has an exclusive interview with a defiant hamas leader. >> is it useful to kill civilians? is that useful to you? >>> and women of a certain age, seeking much younger men. extreme cougar wives looking for love and more, if they can find the right cub. >>> plus, fryer beware. there's a wrong way to do it. a very wrong way. so, tonight, my co-anchor bill weir with a "nightline" holiday tradition. his sorta safe step-by-step guide to deep frying your thanksgiving turkey. >> it's foolproof. gobble gobble, everybody. >> announcer: from the global resources of abc news, with terry moran, cynthia mcfadden and bill weir in new york city, this is "nightline," november 21st, 2012. >> good evening, i'm terry moran. well, tonight, the guns of gaza and israel have gone silent, for now. a hard won and desperately fragile cease-fire is in place, on paper, between israel and palestinians have been schilling each other for days and threatening a wider, bloodier war. in gaza tonight, celebrations as israel agreed to end air stri
to a cease-fire. a deal was announced in cairo by secretary of state hillary clinton and egypt's foreign minister. israel agreed to stop air strikes in gaza, where at least 161 palestinians have been killed since last wednesday. hamas promised to stop firing rockets which have killed five israelis. there were fears the deal might not happen after a bomb went off on a bus in tel aviv this morning. 27 people were hurt, no one has claimed responsibility. we have reports from gaza and israel tonight. we begin with clarissa ward in cairo, where that cease-fire was brokered. >> reporter: after 24 hours of intense shuttle diplomacy, secretary clinton walked away with what she came for: a cease- fire agreement between israel and hamas that she called the first step in a long process. >> the people of this region deserve the chance to live free today's agreement is a step in the right direction that we should build on. now we have to focus on reaching a durable outcome that promotes regional stability and advances the security, dignity and legitimate aspirations of palestinians and israelis alike
-fire between israel and hamas that took effect last night looks to be holding. the deal was announced in cairo and ended eight days of fighting the new islamic egyptian government played a key role in brokering the u.s. backed truce. secretary of state hillary clinton called this a critical moment for the region. following a 24 hour cooling off period talks will resume on key issues like the israeli blockade. susan mcginnis starts us off in washington this morning. good morning to you. happy thanksgiving. >> reporter: good morning. happy thanksgiving. this is a very tenuous cease-fire. deep mistrusts remain on both sides. it feels like both sides have their finger on the trigger. residents are gathering their belongings and heading home. many took refuge in a united nations shelter while israel and the militant group hamas spent eight days in a bloody conflict. under the cease-fire agreement hamas promises to stop firing rockets. israel says it will end air strikes and will ease border restrictions that have stifled gaza's economy for years. after a deal was reached the residents poured into t
cambodia, first to jerusalem, then to the west bank, back to jerusalem and then cairo, in a frantic search for a cease-fire. all day, a truce seemed to be negotiated by israeli bombardment by sea and air and hamas rockets. prospects seemed bleak until the sudden announcement. >> the united states welcomes the agreement today for a cease-fire in gaza. for it to hold, the rocket attacks must end, a broader calm returned. >> reporter: the gunfire in gaza turned to bursts of celebration. but in jerusalem, israel's leaders briefed the nation on the deal grim faced. a deal which seemed beyond reach this morning. the first bus bombing in israel since 2006, in the heart of tel aviv, across the street from the defense ministry. we found the bus cleaved open. and anger. this eyewitness told me he thought it was a rocket, saying that israel can't go on like this, that it must invade gaza. more than 20 wounded by what police say was an ied and the suspect, still at large. even with the cease-fire, the guns weren't silenced. as many as 20 rockets fired out of gaza, hours after the deal was inked. now,
have reports from tel aviv, gaza, and cairo. and ray suarez examines the prospects ahead for the peace deal. >> woodruff: then, margaret warner reports from turkey where the syrian civil war is having an impact along the shared 500 mile border and in ankara. >> with fighting in syrian areas, spilling over into turkish towns, turkey finds itself walking a fine line between defending its interests, and being drawn into a regional war. >> brown: after the deluge: we assess the impact of all the money spent in the most expensive campaign in history. >> woodruff: as recovery costs from superstorm sandy continue to rise, paul solman looks at weather risks and the business of insurance. >> all insurance companies are paying very careful attention to the variability and the volatility in the climate. >> brown: and poet joy harjo celebrates the focal point of families and thanksgiving: the kitchen table. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and
told that he did not agree to that shetion went to cairo, where the one thing she did achieve is she got the egyptian president, mohamed morsi to be the address if hamas breaks the ceasefire and begins firing rockets into israel again, that egypt will be responsible, and will be held responsibility, they have taken responsibility, but this is a verbal agreement, this is not a written agreement, there is no implementation mechanism in place, this is really just a cooling-off period. to see if negotiators can really get at the root issues that are the smuggling tunnels for weapons coming in to the gaza strip, many from iran and the sinai desert, and whether hamas will be disarmed in the end. lou: the stubborn choice for both, palestinians and the israelis, the right to govern themselves, versus the right assurance guaranteed security. how surprising is it, to you, that israel would agree to this ceasefire on the same day a bomb goes off in tel aviv? >> well, it was quite surprising to me, lou, last time there was a terror attack in tel tel avivs who, 006, was in 2006, i remember, i was
is in cairo. but we begin in gaza. this truce was marked by a huge celebration there in gaza today. tell us about it. >> that's true. in fact, tens of thousands of palestinians showed up in gaza city. and actually in cities all across the gaza strip to hear from various leaders of all of the palestinian factions. the biggest one was by far and large in gaza city. some leaders we haven't heard in the past eight days, many in hiding, came out today to address the thousands of people who gathered. they're portraying this and describing this as a victory. they say for the first time hamas has not only defeated israel, but has also shown the world what they're about against a back drop of changes taking place all across the arab world. they also sent a message to the united states saying that they should, the united states should support the palestinian people and not the occupation. hamas was going to remain defiant in the face of israel's aggression on its people. alex? >> okay. thank you very much for the latest from gaza. we go from there to israel. nbc's martin fletcher is standing by in te
defense programs clinton sealed the deal, next went to jerusalem and finally cairo. for final talks with egypt's leaders. nbc's jim maceda has more. >> reporter: morsi, the former muslim brotherhood leader has boosted his credibility with u.s. and israel, and has become a politician to deal with in the arab world but it is one thing to broker a cease-fire, now he will have to enforce it and crack down on hamas and their weapons smuggling >> reporter: president obama who visited israel as a candidate four years ago but not since has to decide his next steps. >> the first thing he has to do is decide whether or not he is going to invest in the effort to resolve the israeli-palestinian conflict. i think at the moment it is a stain on his legacy. >> reporter: the u.s. officials are looking at what could be the birth of a new start with the less clear is how the u.s. will handle hamas, which is clearly empowered >>> and now, how all of this is playing out in israel and gaza, nbc's veteran middle east correspondent martin fletcher is in tel aviv tonight. and our chief foreign corresponden
in what is now early morning live in cairo, egypt. the white house says president obama called israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu and egyptian president mohammed morsi today. the president thanked them for working out a cease-fire deal but also said it's important to keep working on a more durable solution. a live update from the white house coming up on "the fox report." well, tonight, witnesses say the only bullets flying in gaza are shots of celebration. crowds in cars froogd the streets of gaza city after the announcement. earlier today before the deal was done, there was new violence on both sides of the border. team fox coverage continues. david lee miller live in southern israel. david lee, it sounds like the cease-fire is holding at least for now. that's right. trace. it's a little more than five hours since the cease-fire got underway. it is quiet along the border except for the occasional southbound overhead of israeli drones. the scene there very different than hours ago when the cease-fire was announced. there was a barrage of rockets fired into israel. when it took
with the leader of hamas in cairo and asked him about the attack. >> i'm asking you, did hamas claim responsibility? did hamas do that? >> translator: not hamas, not other people, not hamas. no one can announce except those who commit it, not me. the building lesson is what matters. who committed the circumstances that led to this operation. it is netanyahu with his crimes in killing the kids of gaza. and he creates such ramifications everywhere. this could lead to any kind of reaction as retaliation for what happened in gaza. >> our reporters in gaza city said when that -- when the bombing was announced from loud speakers in hamas, there was celebratory gunfire in gaza city. i spoke to christianne amanpour about her interview. >> you pressed on whether they would ever recognize israel. he gave a lot of talking points. this is finally what he to say. let's listen. >> you say you would accept a two-state solution but won't recognize israel's right to exist. >> i accept the state of the 1967. how can i accept israel? they have occupied my land. i need recognition, not the israelis. th
said this evening in cairo at the press conference. that they have to meet the aspirations, we need seriousness in approaching this way of solving the conflict. >> thank you very much for joining me. >>> she joins me when we come back. [ male announcer ] can a car be built around a state of mind? ♪ announcing the all-new 2013 malibu from chevrolet. ♪ with a remarkable new interior featuring the available chevrolet mylink infotainment system. this is where sophisticated styling begins. and where it ends? that's up to you. it's here -- the greatest malibu ever. ♪ that bringing you better technology helps make you a better investor. with our revolutionary e-trade 360 dashboard you see exactly where your money is and what it's doing live. our e-trade pro platform offers powerful functionality that's still so usable you'll actually use it. and our mobile apps are the ultimate in wherever whenever investing. no matter what kind of investor you are, you'll find the technology to help you become a better one at e-trade. we find the best, sweetest craforelobste that we can find. [ male
. christiane amanpour had an exclusive leader with the hamas leader in cairo and asked him about that specific attack. >> no, no, i'm asking you, did hamas claim responsibility? did hamas do that? >> not hamas, not other people from -- not hamas. no one can announce those except those who committed it. not me. the lesson is what matters of the what led to this? who created the circumstances that led to this operations. it is netanyahu with his crimes in killing the kids of gaza, and the continuation. he creates such rea ramificatio. this could lead to what happened in gaza. >> our reporter said when the bombing was announced from loud speakers, there was celebration there in gaza city. i spoke to christiane amanpour. >> reporter: you were wondering about the agreement, let's hear what he had to say, let's listen. >> you say you would accept a two-state solution, but that you will not recognize israel's right to exist? >> i accept a state of the 1967. how can i accept israel? they have occupied my land. i need recognition, not the israelis. this is a reverse question. >> what do you make of wha
in tel-aviv. christiane amanpour had an exclusive interview with the hamas leader in cairo and asked him about that specific attack. >> no, no. i'm asking you. did hamas claim responsibility? did hamas do that? >> translator: not hamas. not other people from -- not hamas. no one can announce except those who committed. not me. the lesson is what matters. what led to this? who created the circumstances that led to this operations. it is netanyahu with his crimes in killing the kids of gaza and the continuation of aggression. ramifications everywhere. this could lead to any kind of reaction as retaliation for what happened in gaza. >> our reporters in gaza city said that when that -- the bombing was announced from loud speakers in mosques, there was some celebratory gunfire heard throughout the city in gaza city. i spoke with christiane amanpour about her interview with the hamas leader. christiane, you repeatedly pressed the head of hamas about whether or not they would ever recognize israel. he gave a lot of talking points. you really pressed him on it. this is finally what he had to say
between ramallah and jerusalem both sides ahead of the agreement and she helped announce it in cairo. >> this is a critical moment for the region. egypt as new government is assuming the responsibility and leadership that has long made this country a region of stability and peace. they will work with partners across the region to consolidate this progress, improve conditions for the people of gaza, provide security for the people of israel. >> president obama has assured israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu he has received funding for the iron dome and u.s. israel defense program. for his part netanyahu says he is committed to the cease fire as long as israeli interests are not threatens. >> i know there are citizens expecting more misevere militar action. at this time the right thing is to use this opportunity to achieve a long lasting cease fire. >> but it is not all good between the israelis and hamas. israelis are going to maintain a maritime blockade of the gaza strip. >> peter doocy thank you. and happy thanksgiving. >> you, too. >> on that note it is the thanksgiving trad
this thing will last. gregg: did secretary clinton's shuttle diplomacy from jerusalem to cairo prove pen official here? >> -- beneficial here in. >> yes, certainly. the administration deserves credit, to be sure, but it's not a major victory in the sense that we have a middle east peace which has been as elusive to this administration as it has been to the previous ones. but at the end of her reign as secretary of state, her tenure is coming to conclusion with mounting criticism over benghazi and the lack of security, this certainly is a plus. gregg: are you surprised at how helpful the new islamist government of muhammad morsi really was in this process as a mediator standing up for the truce, probably pressuring hamas and, of course, their benefactor? are you surprised at what they did? yeah. i think it's a pleasant surprise. i mean, this is not the government we would have wanted in egypt post-mubarak because they are muslim brotherhood, and there's parts of the muslim brotherhood that is totally alien to us, the salafist movement which are radical islamists, but here he is openly spo
this evening in cairo at the press conference. that they have to meet the aspirations of the palestinian people. we need seriousness in approaching this way of solving the conflict. >> thank you very much for joining me. >>> hamas leader says he wants the world to understand his people and his cause. we have an interview exclusively. ♪ [ male announcer ] you build a reputation by not breaking down. consider the silverado 1500 -- still the most dependable, longest-lasting full-size pickups on the road. and now we've also been recognized for lowest total cost of ownership -- based on important things, like depreciation, fuel, and maintenance costs. and now trade up to get a 2012 chevy silverado all-star edition with a total value of $9,000. from outstanding value to standing the test of time, chevy runs deep. i got your campbell's chunky soup. mom? who's mom? i'm the giants mascot. the giants don't have a mascot! ohhh! eat up! new jammin jerk chicken soup has tasty pieces of chicken with rice and beans. hmmm. for giant hunger! thanks mom! see ya! whoaa...oops! mom? i'm ok. grandma? hi sweetie!
to broker the cease. jim is joining us from cairo. this was seen as a test of the relations following the arab spring, so how did it do? >> reporter: morsi has passed the test as ayman and martin suggested, this is the middle east and there's not a lot of optimism. we'll see how morsi chooses. there may be a moment of truth where he has to decide between hamas or with the truce. we don't know how he'll do that or which way he'll go, but so far it's pretty amazing to see this man who was not even a muslim brotherhood's main candidate for president. he was the backup plan now receiving the praises of everyone yesterday from hamas to benjamin netanyahu, clinton, president obama, everyone had good things to say about morsi who is emerging as a pragmatic guy and politician but as a regional star. hillary clinton spent hours with morsi and his foreign minister talking about stopping the hostilities and negotiating everything else later. this time with morsi as the mediator, today in "the new york times" you can actually see the turnaround in president obama's thinking about morsi. it starte
to jerusalem and then to cairo. a truce that seemed to be negotiated by israeli bombardment by sea and air and hamas rockets. suddenly the announcement. >> united states welcomes the agreement today for a cease-fire in gaza. if it holds, rockets must end. >> it turned into bursts of celebration. but in jerusalem they briefed the nation on the deal glum faced. the first bus bombing since 2006 in the heart of tel aviv across the street from the defense ministry. this iet said -- this eyewitness said he thought it was rocket. more than 20 that were wounded they say it was an ide. at least 20 rockets fired out of gaza hours after the deal. >> dan: in gaza tonight, enormous relief. people breaking out into spontaneous celebration. >>> the green flags were raised across the gaza strip. palestinians poured into the streets. >> there is sense of relief on the street but this a victory celebration. after a week of fighting with israel, the palestinians feel like they have won. >> won because for the first time militant groups were able to fire rockets into israel's biggest city, jerusalem and tel a
and cairo. >> people of this region deserve the chance to live free from fear and violence and today's agreement is a step in the right direction. >> reporter: clinton expects egypt to play a key role in maintaining peace. susan mcginnis, cbs news, washington. >>> the woman of who has taken a lot of heat in the aftermath of the benghazi attack is now defending herself. yeah. for weeks, u.n. ambassador susan rice has been attacked by senator john mccain for participating in what he described as a cover-up. >> this president and this administration have either been guilty of colossal incompetence or engaged in a cover-up. >> mccain says rice made misleading comments in the days immediately following the benghazi attack in libya. >>> rice is being considered for secretary of state. some republican senators have vowed to block her nomination. she spoke publicly about the controversy finally yesterday. >> when discussing the attacks against our facilities in benghazi, i relied solely and squarely on the information provided to me by the intelligence community. i made clear that the inform
because morsi hails from the brotherhood, a political cousin to hamas. we are joined from cairo. how are egyptians feeling about this cease-fire this morning? >> reporter: well, if you're the leadership of the muslim brotherhood in cairo you're patting yourself on the back today because they really came out looking very favorably in the international community throughout this process. this is a big test for egypt's government led now but the muslim brotherhood. a talk show host had a lot of concern. would this be a movement that would take up arms? would this be a movement that would give material support for hamas. it turns out that those fears, the way things stand right now turned out to be groundless. it looks like this is a government that's approached this very even handedly to keep their peace treaty and their economic alliances with washington and western capitals. in the end it doesn't look like this is a government that wanted to be seen as radical in the community. >>> back at home u.s. ambassador susan rice is speaking out about those talking points that she delivered on
that sparked violent protests around the world including outside the embassy in cairo. since the arab spring we have seen big changesn the volatile region. how will he handle foreign policy in the next four years? we asked our experts. >> i know it's a complicated issue, but is there a way to describe our current foreign policy? >> it's a very complex situation because we have a number of foreign policy problems. iran, syria. evolution of the arab spring and we have number of fundamental changes that is going on in the distribution of the economy and china, conditions in russia. there are a number of problems anew environment. we have not developed a coherent approach because in the first term you learn your job. that is the challenge that the administration is facing. >> people look to the united states for leadership. they look to us because we have for so long been in a position where we've been able because of our resources and military strength, because of our values, we've been able to keep the peace. we have been able to make sure that enemies feared us and make sure allies could count o
, in the hour and a half between the time the announcement was made in cairo and the cease-fire went into effect, we saw increasing numbers of israeli air strikes, artillery barrages into gaza city itself. some of them quite close to where i'm standing. and we saw three separate volley of rockets fired from gaza city toward israel. it did seem as if they were working against the clock to get just a few last whips in or hits in to the other side before the cease-fire went into effect. when it did go into effect, it became very calm, very quiet. then we started to hear celebratory gunfire coming from a bit of the distance from here. but it came closer and closer and we saw more and more cars out on the street. more than we've seen now for the last eight days for quite some time. there were very few cars out. definitely after dark, hardly any. but it went very quickly from pretty quiet to very noisy here in gaza city. >> can you talk about celebratory, some people celebrating that it's over and they could live their lives and they weren't afraid. others possibly celebrating they thought they scored
of the region. >> the leader of hamas held his own press conference in cairo today, during which he said that while his side agrees to the cease-fire, his fighters have, quote, their hands on the trigger. in jerusalem, the israeli prime minister, benjamin net ya hyan hew, also spoke about the cease-fire agreement. look at this. "prime minister benjamin netanyahu this evening spoke with u.s. president barack obama and acceded to his recommendation to give the egyptian cease-fire proposal a chance." he acceded to what president obama wanted. in other words, this is the american's idea, not mine, but i'm going to go along with it, because they're advising me i ought. it's very specific language, highlighting how central the united states is and what's happening right now, but also, sort of distancing israel from the cease-fire. making it our american cease-fire and not theirs. the most important thing tonight for people who are living in range of the rockets and the air strikes is that, of course, the cease-fire appears to be holding, at least for tonight. in terms of how likely it is to ho
is live in cairo. some are saying that mohammed morsi is the real winner here. you have all sides facing the same person. americans giving him high marks for his mediation, even some israeli officials praising the president. as far as the mediation goes, there were some concerns about which direction he would say, a long-term member of the muslim brotherhood and a public sympathizer of hamas. and in the end, he worked closely with u.s. officials about that days of violence. he had all those conversations with president obama. >> we are wondering. he is trying to change the constitution and give themselves more power. what can you tell us about that? >> some dramatic developments which have just occurred in the last hours, and we have had four days of protests. they could be extremely large tomorrow. what the egyptian president has done is basically said that no one can overrule any of his decrees since he became president in june. not even the courts. he also said any of those guilty for killing protesters in masters revolution, they would be retried. president mohammed morsi on the heel
'm charlie d'agata, gaza city. >>> clachling victory for a different reason. clarissa ward is in cairo where the truce agreement was sealed yesterday. what are the possible sticking points in this new cease fire agreement? >> reporter: good morning, charlie. good morning, gayle. happy thanksgiving. the main sticking point that may arrive with this agreement is that in the third clause of that cease fire agreement that essentially says after a cooling off period israel must start opening up gaza borders and allow for free passage of trade and also people. israel is very reticassant of lifting that blockade. you may see weapons into the hands of militants but hamas is adamant that that blockade needs to be lifted. a few sticking points raised with that one. >> what does the role that egypt played mean for egypt and the region going forward? >> reporter: egypt has definitely emerged as the winner in all of this. secretary of state clinton calling it a cornerstone of stability in the region. and i think the west had been a little bit concerned about how egypt's recentl
. it was announced yesterday by the egyptian foreign minister in cairo, at a joint press conference with secretary clinton we heard her there. he announced hostilities would stop at 9:00 p.m. local time. both sides, israel and hamas were still attacking each other to the last moment. israeli radio said some rockets were fired from gaza into southern israel, shortly after the cease-fire came, but no sign of israeli response or israeli retaliation. but since midnight, the idf, israeli defense forces say no rockets were fired from gaza. so far, the truce seems to be holding. we're over 11 hours into the cease-fire agreement, and it seems to be holding. but the israeli prime minister, benjamin netanyahu warned of more severe action if the truce doesn't hold, if israeli citizens are unable to live in peace from the incoming rockets from hamas threatening them. if that happens, the israeli government would take severe action. they are using the opportunity to achieve a long lasting cease-fire. one senior israeli official said the threat of a ground invasion will remain in that case. he says we can alway
coordinator to remain in cairo to support the efforts to achieve a sustainable cease- fire. finally, mr. president, let me conclude, as i have in all my discussions with intensity, that in these testing times, we must not lose sight that peace must remain our priority. a two-state solution ending the occupation, and ending the conflict between israel and the palestinians is more urgent than ever. achieving this vision, which has been expressed by this council, has been long overdue and necessary for the stability of the region. comprehensive peace can lead -- can bring lasting security. i am leaving shortly. i wish you a happy thanksgiving. thank you, mr. president. >> i thank the secretary general for his briefing. there are no more names inscribed on the list of speakers. david plouffe and steve schmidt discuss the 2012 eletion next. later, the chairman of cbs news, jeff fager on the future of journalism and cbs news. tomorrow, university of maryland professor shibley telhami on israel and hamas cease-fire. then, poverty in the united states. jacqueline pata explains with the sequest
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)